Category Archives: School in a Book: The Workbooks

Free K-12 Worksheets: Chemistry Level One

blue green and red abstract illustration
Photo by Alexander Grey on Pexels.com

The following is a sample worksheet taken from my book, School in a Book: The Science Worksheets. Clearly, the formatting leaves much to be desired, but if you make sure to print in portrait mode and only the desired pages, you should get a workable copy.

Of course, you can also purchase a copy of School in a Book: The Science Worksheets, which contains a complete overview of important concepts from chemistry, physics, astronomy, biology, genetics, botany, zoology, anatomy, medical science, geology, ecology and meteorology in about 100 effective matching worksheets. The goal is that by the time a student completes all of the workbooks several times, or simply studies School in a Book on their own (which might be harder!), they will have gained a thorough review of much of what their K-12 education covers.

To look over the complete content of School in a Book, read it for free here. The matching worksheets follow it almost exactly.

***

School in a Book: The Science Worksheets: Chemistry Level One

Instructions: Read through the definitions at the bottom of the worksheet, then fold that part of the paper underneath to hide them. On the top part of the worksheet, draw a line from each word from the word bank to the definition that best fits it.

***

Gas ~ Density ~ Chemistry ~ Mass ~ Chemical ~ Liquid

Particle ~ Weight ~ Solid ~ Matter ~ Three states of matter

***

The science of matter, including what it is and how it’s made

Anything that is made of particles, takes up space (has volume), and has mass. It is one of only two “things” in the universe. The other is energy.

Any substance made up of two or more atoms. Note that this word is also used to refer to human-synthesized substances; however, this is a colloquial usage.

A measure of the force of gravity on something. It changes relative to where in space an object is located; for example, a book weighs less on the moon than on the earth.

A measure of something’s absolute heaviness (the amount of matter within it). It doesn’t change when the forces (such as the gravitational force) change because it is measured relative to an absolute standard (one kilogram).

The measure of something’s mass per unit of volume. Objects with more of this are heavier than other objects that take up the same amount of space.

A very small unit of matter that has properties such as mass, charge, and spin. These include atoms, molecules, ions, protons, neutrons, and electrons. Note that physicists have also discovered other mysterious particles that don’t seem quite physical in nature.

Solid, liquid and gas

A substance with a definite shape and definite volume

A substance with definite volume but a varying shape

A substance without a definite shape or definite volume. Note that air is not a gas, but a mixture of gases and other particles. The various gases aren’t chemically bonded to each other, and can be separated without breaking any chemical bonds.

***

Answers:

Chemistry: The science of matter, including what it is and how it’s made

Chemical: Any substance made up of two or more atoms. Note that this word is also used to refer to human-synthesized substances; however, this is a colloquial usage.

Matter: Anything that is made of particles, takes up space (has volume), and has mass. It is one of only two “things” in the universe. The other is energy.

Weight: A measure of the force of gravity on something. It changes relative to where in space an object is located; for example, a book weighs less on the moon than on the earth.

Mass: A measure of something’s absolute heaviness (the amount of matter within it). It doesn’t change when the forces (such as the gravitational force) change because it is measured relative to an absolute standard (one kilogram).

Density: The measure of something’s mass per unit of volume. Objects with more of this are heavier than other objects that take up the same amount of space.

Particle: A very small unit of matter that has properties such as mass, charge, and spin. These include atoms, molecules, ions, protons, neutrons, and electrons. Note that physicists have also discovered other mysterious particles that don’t seem quite physical in nature.

The three states of matter: Solid, liquid and gas

Solid: A substance with a definite shape and definite volume

Liquid: A substance with definite volume but a varying shape

Gas: A substance without a definite shape or definite volume. Note that air is not a gas, but a mixture of gases and other particles. The various gases aren’t chemically bonded to each other, and can be separated without breaking any chemical bonds.

***

This is a supplementary learning tool for readers of School in a Book: A Ridiculously Concise K-12 Review by Mollie Player, which provides an overview of all K-12 subjects in a single volume. Read excerpts at MolliePlayer.com/school-in-a-book.